GadgetGuy: G-mee may save your kids from a bad habit – a smartphone one!

Read the full review on the GagdetGuy website.

G-mee is the brainchild of Charlie and Rachael Brown – you may know him from the Channel 9 Cybershack TV show.

G-mee is really a personal content player that integrates measures for safe exploration of smart technology. It has an innovative pre-installed ‘G-mee app lock’ to guide the user’s smart device experience, and curb temptations to over-share or exposure to online risks, such as cyber-bullying.

You can block apps such as Facebook, YouTube or streaming services that can expose users to unsuitable content, or place them at risk of cyber-bullying. It is parental control on the device!

So, we decided to review the phone. And that is in two parts. Less important is the hardware. Most important is the app lock.

To read the full review from GadgetGuy simply click here.

WhistleOut: G-mee Plus Review

Read the full review on the WhistleOut website.

G-mee makes devices specifically for children, meaning they are durable, and filled to the brim with online safety features straight out of the box. While every G-mee device looks like a phone, the G-mee Plus is a WiFi only media device, which can be a viable alternative to passing over your phone anytime your little one wants to watch a video or play a game.

Having spent over 14 years working with kids, and with a degree to prove it, I know my way around toddler and teenage tantrums alike. If you’re looking for a phone, or a phone alternative for your own child then you’re probably familiar with them too.

It’s no secret that children and adults operate differently; no grown up has ever asked me what my third favourite reptile is, and then cried and threw a toy at the wall when it wasn’t the frilled neck lizard. So when we’re looking at a phone that’s made for kids, it’s important to think like one.

While there are a range of factors that separate the men from the boys, and the women from the girls, it can boil down to just four main aspects.

  1. Physical
    Tiny humans have tiny hands, enough said.
  2. Emotional regulation
    Adults have greater control over their emotions. We can identify how we feel and take steps to handle those emotions. Children however, might not be able to differentiate between angry and tired, or hungry and sad, and tend to act unpredictably because of it.
  3. Narcissism and empathy
    There are self-obsessed adults, but children are all tiny, cherub narcissists who only care about themselves. In fact children don’t develop empathy properly until they’re around seven years old. If an activity or moment doesn’t serve them, then they are likely to abandon it or derail it so the focus can be back where it belongs, solely on them.
  4. Impulsivity
    Children have no filter. If you look tired, they will almost definitely tell you loudly, and usually in a crowd. Kids tend to act on impulse, if a thought or whim compels them then it will almost definitely manifest into reality.

You’re probably thinking “cool story, but what does this have to do with anything?” To properly ascertain whether the G-mee Plus is the right device for your kid, I’m going to be pitting it against the four cornerstones of childishness. Is it up for the challenge? Let’s see.


To read the full review from WhistleOut simply click here.